The Three Guineas

Reading

This Grade II-listed building was once the central railway ticket office for Great Western Railway, fondly known as ‘God’s Wonderful Railway’ in an ode to its success.

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Client
Fullers
Location
Reading
Category
Pub
Completed
February 2017
Photographer

Architect and chief engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel was responsible for its design and, as part of his pioneering vision to provide easy travel between London and New York, created the record-breaking locomotive, ‘The Three Guineas’.

Fuller’s enlisted Concorde BGW to breathe life back into this tired train station pub, re-introducing the great history of Reading’s once grand Victorian station hall. Mahogany panelling and a four-sided station clock suspended above a beautiful quartz bar, perfectly capture the grandness and elegance of early Victorian station waiting and dining rooms. 

This theme is continued into the basement which Concorde have named Firefly, after the first engine pulling carriages out of Reading Station at its launch in 1860. In homage to this, a photograph of the engine sits in pride of place at the new cellar bar. 

Firefly celebrates the age of the Victorian empire through unique features including; a bespoke mural depicting a map of the world at the height of the Victorian empire, a wall of top hats, taxidermy, apothecary and vaulted brickwork. This all comes together to create a truly remarkable space which will become indispensable to Fullers for functions, parties and private events.

The terrace is vast and with upwards of 40,000 people walking past every day, the design plays an integral part in the prominence of the site at Reading station. Beautiful hardwood planters surround the outdoor fixed seating and booths, which are arranged under a cast iron canopy. Illuminated station signs and lanterns are suspended overhead, directing travellers to the different areas within the station in distinctive Victorian style. 

The overall finished design is timeless, suiting the buildings architecture and evoking the elegance of early Victorian stations and dining rooms.

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